Archives

now browsing by author

 

Police: Bust on former Christmas tree farm nets $100K in marijuana – KSL.com

Redirect Notice

Redirect Notice

 The previous page is sending you to http://www.ksl.com/?nid=148.

 If you do not want to visit that page, you can return to the previous page.

Christmas Tree Fire Hazard Prevention – KRGV

MCALLEN People are gearing up to take down their holiday decorations. Fire officials say getting rid of your Christmas tree should be high on the list. 

City of McAllen Fire Marshal Juan Salinas says real trees pose the biggest threat, “Right after Christmas, they need to get rid of it. They need to test the limbs, if they’re brittle and get rid of them quick.”

Salinas says the longer you wait, the chances of a fire increase, “In the Latino culture, they wait until January the sixth, which is the Three King’s (Day) and that’s too long.”

He adds using old Christmas lights wrapped around a dry tree increase the chances even further, “Sometimes, they’ve been used years and years and the electrical cords are brittle and if there’s a little short there, that can cause a fire.” 

Salinas says a lot of people buy their live Christmas trees before the Thanksgiving holidays. When Christmas time rolls around the tree is already drying out. 

Rick Castro bought his tree around Thanksgiving, he takes it to the City of McAllen Recycling Center. “I bring out our Christmas tree as soon as Christmas is over and I recycle here in the City of McAllen.”

He says he does it every year to help keep the city clean, Castro says, “Yeah, I do see unwanted Christmas trees thrown on the curbs or what have you, so it’s sad.”

Luis Matos also takes advantage of the service. He says despite his best efforts his tree is already getting dry, he says, “I’ve had it for a while, kept it watered but it was already getting dry .”

Salinas says he wants to see more people utilize this service to prevent fires, “Christmas tree fires are not that common, but when they do that’s when we have casualties because it burns real fast.” 

He says no fires have happened so far, but it an accident waiting to happen. 

You don’t have to live in McAllen to take your tree to the recycling or compost center. Anyone can drop their tree off until the end of January. 

If you do decide to take your tree don’t drop it off on the curb. Also make sure the tree is clean, Renewable Resources Manger Robert Trevino says, “Make sure they’re free of the ornaments and the lights, debris free basically and drop them off and we’ll be shredding these Christmas trees at the end of January and making Christmas mulch, so it will have that nice pine smell to it.”

Christmas Tree Drop Off Locations:

City of McAllen Recycling Center

2101 N. Bentsen Rd.

8 A.M. – 4:30 P.M.

956-681-4050

Compost Facility 

5201 N. 29th St.

8 A.M. – 4 P.M.

DC woman finds unpleasant surprise in Christmas tree – WTOP

Christmas tree fire prevention safety tips – FOX 5 DC

With the holiday coming up, experts are providing a safety reminder to protect yourself from Christmas tree fires. FOX 5’s Tom Fitzgerald has more.

PhotoChristmas tree fire prevention safety tips COLLEGE PARK, Md. – January marks the one-year anniversary of a massive Annapolis mansion fire that killed a couple and their four grandchildren. Investigators say the blaze on January 19, 2014 was caused due to a dry Christmas tree.

As the holiday season is in full swing, fire experts are launching a new reminder about how critical it is for you to water a live tree in your home.

Each year, there are 230 Christmas tree fires claiming nearly a half-dozen lives. To make sure that doesn’t happen in your home, researchers at the University of Maryland are hard at work.

Dr. Issac Leventon burns for Christmas literally at the university’s Department of Fire Protection. On this day, he set three Christmas trees on fire to show how differently they burn.

“When you see it starting to dry out, bristles are falling off and it’s starting to brown,” he said. “That’s when you’re going to see issues of where it’s going to ignite really quickly.”

First up was a tree they bought two weeks ago and have watered regularly. The watered tree burns slow and steady just as predicted. It takes time for the entire tree to be covered in flames.

“For us, the difference is a wet and dry tree is going to be obvious and hopefully we can show why you should keep it healthy,” said Dr. Leventon.

Next, they lit a dry tree that has not been watered in two weeks. You can see and feel a big difference in heat. In seconds, it’s fully engulfed in flames — faster even than Leventon thought.

“I expected it to take 20 seconds and it took 10 to 15, so it’s not surprising that tree did grow [in flames] as quickly as it did,” he said.

Finally, one last test — another dry tree. But this time, he had sprinklers spray water on the fire. The tree burns, but at a much slower pace than the last dry tree.

Three different Christmas trees, three different fires, but one common lesson.

“It’s not a very common fire, but when they do grow and when they do ignite, you saw how quickly it’s going to burn,” said Dr. Leventon.

Clearly, the bottom line of this reminder is to water your trees and avoid a dangerous disaster this holiday season.

Although Christmas tree fires are not common, when they do occur, they are more likely to be serious.

Here are some Christmas tree safety tips from the National Fire Protection Association:

Picking the tree

  • Choose a tree with fresh, green needles that do not fall off when touched.

Placing the tree

  • Before placing the tree in the stand, cut 2″ from the base of the trunk.
  • Make sure the tree is at least three feet away from any heat source, like fireplaces, radiators, candles, heat vents or lights.
  • Make sure the tree is not blocking an exit.
  • Add water to the tree stand. Be sure to add water daily.

Lighting the tree

  • Use lights that have the label of an independent testing laboratory. Some lights are only for indoor or outdoor use.
  • Replace any string of lights with worn or broken cords or loose bulb connections. Read manufacturer’s instructions for number of light strands to connect. 
  • Never use lit candles to decorate the tree.
  • Always turn off Christmas tree lights before leaving home or going to bed.

After Christmas

  • Get rid of the tree after Christmas. Dried-out trees are a fire danger and should not be left in the home or garage, or placed outside against the home. Check with your local community to find a recycling program. Bring outdoor electrical lights inside after the holidays to prevent hazards and make them last longer.

Click here for more Christmas tree fire safety tips from the U.S. Fire Administration.

Christmas tree in park to be replaced – Times-Journal

City officials said the Christmas tree transplanted into City Park has died.

But, the city has plans to transplant another tree in time for the holiday season.

“The tree was put in last year,” Griggs said. “They have to be transplanted after the hot weather but before the real cold weather starts. You don’t really notice whether or not they are going to make it until the heat of the summer.”

Griggs said the city has planted many trees and said the survival rate is low.

“Normally, if you plant 10 trees, no matter the size or kind, you’re probably going to lose at least three,” he said. “There is no guarantee on them. That’s the second one that we attempted to put in the park and neither one made it.”

He said there are multiple reasons why the trees haven’t survived, which can include ground contamination, shock, the size of the root ball and more.

“We made sure it was well fertilized and watered everyday,” Griggs said. “There is no rhyme or reason as to why they make it and why they don’t. They just didn’t make it.”

Mayor Larry Chesser said the city is going to replace the tree, probably in late October or early November.

“We have another one we’ve looked at taking up from the Alabama Walking Park,” Chesser said. “It’s almost as big as the one that’s there now. The dead one will be replaced before Christmas, and hopefully this new one will live. It’s hard to make them live. We are going to try to have a green one for Christmas.”

The project began in December 2014 when 10-year-old Avery Phillips wrote Chesser a letter asking about Fort Payne having a community Christmas tree.

“I am a 10-year-old girl and have seen many Christmas lights and scenes during my lifetime,” the letter stated. “I have seen many cities with tree-lighting ceremonies that have done this service for people who might not have a tree of their own to see lit.

“I would like to see the city of Fort Payne have a tree-lighting ceremony of its own,” the letter continued. “If this is possible, please let me know, and I will be happy to help with this by helping to raise money or perform other needed tasks.”

Chesser responded by appointing Phillips as the Community Christmas Tree Chairman for the 2015 holiday season.

In a letter to Phillips, Chesser told her he, too, believes a community Christmas tree and lighting ceremony would mean a lot to the residents and the idea had been tossed around before.

He told her she would need to work out the details of the event.

“You will need to line up volunteers, select a location and arrange with our parks and recreation department for the necessary supplies,” Chesser stated in the letter. “Our public works department can help with a bucket truck and tree placement, if you decide on a real tree.”

Phillips previously told the Times-Journal she was excited to be a part of making Christmas a little more special for the citizens of Fort Payne.

“I’m very excited about it,” Phillips said. “And, I’m excited to be the chairman. I’ve never gotten to be part of anything that important and big.”

Workers drag 6-foot Christmas tree out of San Antonio sewer – mySanAntonio.com

  • SAWS workers pulled a decaying 6-foot Christmas tree from an open manhole near Leon Creek Greenway Park on the city's Northwest Side. SAWS spokeswoman Anne Hayden said the tree was disrupting sewage flow and causing backups in the shallow main, collecting flushed wipes and rags. Photo: Courtesy Of SAWS

    Photo By Courtesy of SAWS 

    SAWS workers pulled a decaying 6-foot Christmas tree from an open manhole near Leon Creek Greenway Park on the city’s Northwest Side. SAWS spokeswoman Anne Hayden said the tree was disrupting sewage flow and causing backups in the shallow main, collecting flushed wipes and rags.

  • Strange objects and creepy animals clog sewer lines in San Antonio, which can cause back-ups and leaks. To combat the unwanted jams, the San Antonio Water System has enlisted the help of small, tractor-looking robots - armed with cameras and mini water hoses that can clear out the objects. Check out some of the photos taken by the SAWS sewer robots.

    Strange objects and creepy animals clog sewer lines in San Antonio, which can cause back-ups and leaks. To combat the unwanted jams, the San Antonio Water System has enlisted the help of small, tractor-looking robots – armed with cameras and mini water hoses that can clear out the objects.

    Check out some of the photos taken by the SAWS sewer robots.

  • Great Plains Rat snake in a San Antonio sewer. Photo: SAWS, Courtesy

    Photo By SAWS, courtesy 

    Great Plains Rat snake in a San Antonio sewer.

  • SAWS workers rescued a furry visitor trapped in the sewer sytem on Friday. A photo provided by SAWS — and shared through their Twitter account with the caption, "Wait... that's no sewer rat!" — shows a raccoon trapped in a sewer line. Photo: Courtesy Of SAWS

    Photo By Courtesy of SAWS 

    SAWS workers rescued a furry visitor trapped in the sewer sytem on Friday. A photo provided by SAWS — and shared through their Twitter account with the caption, “Wait… that’s no sewer rat!” — shows a raccoon trapped in a sewer line.

  • Roach (top left) and grease in a San Antonio sewer. Photo: Courtesy, SAWS

    Photo By courtesy, SAWS 

    Roach (top left) and grease in a San Antonio sewer.

  • A rat in a San Antonio sewer. Photo: SAWS, Courtesy

    Photo By SAWS, courtesy 

    A rat in a San Antonio sewer.

  • Turtle in a San Antonio sewer. Photo: Courtesy, SAWS

    Photo By courtesy, SAWS 

    Turtle in a San Antonio sewer.

  • Great Plains Rat snake in a San Antonio sewer. Photo: SAWS, Courtesy

    Photo By SAWS, courtesy 

    Great Plains Rat snake in a San Antonio sewer.

  • Basketball in a San Antonio sewer. Photo: SAWS, Courtesy

    Photo By SAWS, courtesy 

    Basketball in a San Antonio sewer.

  • SAWS workers pulled a mysterious object that turned out to be a giant rock from the sewers after video footage found it blocking a pipe on Monday. Photo: Courtesy Of SAWS

    Photo By Courtesy of SAWS 

    SAWS workers pulled a mysterious object that turned out to be a giant rock from the sewers after video footage found it blocking a pipe on Monday.

  • The San Antonio Water System tweeted this image Dec. 16, 2014, of "flushable" wipes pulled out of the sewer system with the message, "Seriously, who flushes this stuff?" Photo: Fechter, Joshua I, SAWS/Screenshot Via Twitter

    Photo By Fechter, Joshua I/SAWS/Screenshot via Twitter 

    The San Antonio Water System tweeted this image Dec. 16, 2014, of “flushable” wipes pulled out of the sewer system with the message, “Seriously, who flushes this stuff?”

  • The San Antonio Water System tweeted this image of "flushable" wipes pulled out of the sewer system. SAWS is seeing an uptick of clogged pipes caused by "flushable" wipes. The agency is trying to build awareness of the problem using the hashtag #WipesClogPipes on social media. Photo: Fechter, Joshua I, Screenshot Via Twitter

    Photo By Fechter, Joshua I/Screenshot via Twitter 

    The San Antonio Water System tweeted this image of “flushable” wipes pulled out of the sewer system. SAWS is seeing an uptick of clogged pipes caused by “flushable” wipes. The agency is trying to build awareness of the problem using the hashtag #WipesClogPipes on social media.

  • The San Antonio Water System is seeing an uptick of clogged pipes caused by "flushable" wipes. The agency is trying to build awareness of the problem using the hashtag #WipesClogPipes on social media. Photo: Courtesy Of SAWS

    Photo By Courtesy of SAWS 

    The San Antonio Water System is seeing an uptick of clogged pipes caused by “flushable” wipes. The agency is trying to build awareness of the problem using the hashtag #WipesClogPipes on social media.

  • The San Antonio Water System is seeing an uptick of clogged pipes caused by "flushable" wipes. The agency is trying to build awareness of the problem using the hashtag #WipesClogPipes on social media. Photo: Courtesy Of SAWS

    Photo By Courtesy of SAWS 

    The San Antonio Water System is seeing an uptick of clogged pipes caused by “flushable” wipes. The agency is trying to build awareness of the problem using the hashtag #WipesClogPipes on social media.

  • That "flushable" wipe may not be so flushable: wipes flushed into the sewer system are clogging pipes in cities all over the country, including San Antonio. "Those so-called 'flushables' like cleansing wipes and feminine hygiene products won't clog your toilet if you're lucky," said Anne Hayden, a spokeswoman for the San Antonio Water System, in an email. "But, they will cause major damage to your sewer system, and they may contribute to sewage backing into your home or office." Photo: Courtesy Of SAWS

    Photo By Courtesy of SAWS 

    That “flushable” wipe may not be so flushable: wipes flushed into the sewer system are clogging pipes in cities all over the country, including San Antonio. “Those so-called ‘flushables’ like cleansing wipes and feminine hygiene products won’t clog your toilet if you’re lucky,” said Anne Hayden, a spokeswoman for the San Antonio Water System, in an email. “But, they will cause major damage to your sewer system, and they may contribute to sewage backing into your home or office.”

  • Yanking chunks of congealed wipes is regular business for SAWS workers. Hayden said that these wipes — though marketed as flushable — don't actually dissolve when flushed. Photo: Courtesy Of SAWS

    Photo By Courtesy of SAWS 

    Yanking chunks of congealed wipes is regular business for SAWS workers. Hayden said that these wipes — though marketed as flushable — don’t actually dissolve when flushed.

  • "Instead of dissolving like toilet paper, these items bond together with grease forming long, mop-like clumps of gunk that clog sewer pipes, damage equipment and cause sewer spills," Hayden said. To prevent that, Hayden suggested disposing of these wipes and other products deemed "flushable" in the trash, along with grease from plates, pots and pans. "Remember, no matter what the product package says, only three things are truly flushable: human waste, toilet paper and water," Hayden said. Photo: Courtesy Of SAWS

    Photo By Courtesy of SAWS 

    “Instead of dissolving like toilet paper, these items bond together with grease forming long, mop-like clumps of gunk that clog sewer pipes, damage equipment and cause sewer spills,” Hayden said. To prevent that, Hayden suggested disposing of these wipes and other products deemed “flushable” in the trash, along with grease from plates, pots and pans. “Remember, no matter what the product package says, only three things are truly flushable: human waste, toilet paper and water,” Hayden said.

  • Large equipment is brought in as a SAWS maintenance crew cleans out a clogged siphon system near the intersection of Eisenhauer and Corinne on August 7, 2013. Read more about the problems 'flushable' wipes are causing on ExpressNews.com. Photo: Tom Reel, San Antonio Express-News

    Photo By Tom Reel/San Antonio Express-News 

    Large equipment is brought in as a SAWS maintenance crew cleans out a clogged siphon system near the intersection of Eisenhauer and Corinne on August 7, 2013. Read more about the problems ‘flushable’ wipes are causing on ExpressNews.com.
  • Debris nearly reaches the top of a manhole as a SAWS maintenance crew cleans out a clogged siphon system near the intersection of Eisenhauer and Corinne on August 7, 2013. Photo: Tom Reel, San Antonio Express-News

    Photo By Tom Reel/San Antonio Express-News 

    Debris nearly reaches the top of a manhole as a SAWS maintenance crew cleans out a clogged siphon system near the intersection of Eisenhauer and Corinne on August 7, 2013.

  • Carlos Martinez (left) and Aaron Loney use a claw mechanism to extract debris as a SAWS maintenance crew cleans out a clogged siphon system near the intersection of Eisenhauer and Corinne on August 7, 2013. Photo: TOM REEL

    Photo By TOM REEL 

    Carlos Martinez (left) and Aaron Loney use a claw mechanism to extract debris as a SAWS maintenance crew cleans out a clogged siphon system near the intersection of Eisenhauer and Corinne on August 7, 2013.

  • Plastic bonds sludge together as a SAWS maintenance crew cleans out a clogged siphon system near the intersection of Eisenhauer and Corinne on August 7, 2013. Photo: Tom Reel, San Antonio Express-News

    Photo By Tom Reel/San Antonio Express-News 

    Plastic bonds sludge together as a SAWS maintenance crew cleans out a clogged siphon system near the intersection of Eisenhauer and Corinne on August 7, 2013.

  • Plastic bonds sludge together as a SAWS maintenance crew cleans out a clogged siphon system near the intersection of Eisenhauer and Corinne on August 7, 2013. Photo: Tom Reel, San Antonio Express-News

    Photo By Tom Reel/San Antonio Express-News 

    Plastic bonds sludge together as a SAWS maintenance crew cleans out a clogged siphon system near the intersection of Eisenhauer and Corinne on August 7, 2013.

  • Column: Picking the right Christmas tree – Worthington Daily Globe

    Advertisement

    lifestyles Worthington, 56187

    Worthington Minnesota 300 11th Street / P.O. Box 639 56187

    When I was a kid, it was always a huge deal to go with Dad and pick out our Christmas tree. My sisters and I would pile into the car, and we’d drive — not to the nearest Christmas tree farm or even pre-cut lot (there were none on the island where I lived) — but rather to wherever it was that Dad deemed best to cut down a tree that year. Some years we had permission from friends or acquaintances to cut any tree we chose as a way to help thin out their overgrown woods, but other years I’m pretty sure that Dad just stopped at a likely place and hoped for the best.

    Advertisement

    The particulars of choosing a tree were very important. It had to be tall enough to look good in our cathedral-ceilinged living room. (I’m thinking 15 feet was our average.) And it had to have branches that were spaced far enough apart so that the ornaments could hang nicely without touching the branches below. Even though Mom wasn’t with us as we cut the tree, her exact requirements rang loudly in our ears.

    There was one year when Dad thought he had found the perfect specimen. The tree was tall, and its branches were spaced on the trunk in such a way that every single one of Mom’s ornaments would hang freely. My sisters and I weren’t so sure, but it wasn’t really up to us.

    We brought the tree home on the roof of our station wagon, its tip extending far past the windshield. Dad and my oldest sister carried it into the house where it was placed into a five-gallon bucket of wet sand.

    Mom came to inspect and about keeled over in shock. Her requirements had been met, there was no doubt about that. The tree had a good 15 inches between each layer of branches. It was tall and narrow and resembled a ladder with one side missing.  

    It looked a lot worse inside than it had in the frozen swamp where we’d found it.

    Dad was proud that he’d found Mom the perfect tree for her requirements. Mom was never quite so adamant about her requirements again.

    Isn’t it funny how our expectations — our requirements — about God can fail us? We all have ideas of who God is, which are dependent upon many things, such as our upbringing, our personal histories, our father images, or our views of religion. With those ideas come expectations that tarnish or at least mold our ideas of what God is like and how He will behave.

    But the truth is, God will do whatever he wants whether we agree with Him or not. He is not tied to our expectations. He doesn’t think the way we do.  But we can always trust Him to do what is best. We can always trust Him to, in essence, “pick the right Christmas tree.” Even if that tree seems absurd at the time.

    “Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise; His greatness no one can fathom.” Psalm 145:3

    Gretchen O’Donnell is a freelance writer who lives in rural Worthington with her husband and three children. She has a master’s degree from Bethel Seminary and enjoys writing about the things she sees and applying theological truths to everyday situations. Her column, The Disheveled Theologian, runs twice monthly.

    Advertisement

    Advertisement

    Christmas Tree Shops employee fired for stopping shoplifter – My Fox Boston

    SALEM, N.H. (MyFoxBoston.com) — A local worker was not praised, but instead let go for what many say was doing the right thing.

    The woman, an employee at the Christmas Tree Shops in Salem, NH, reportedly saw someone shoplifting, so she went after them. The store did not agree with her actions.

    Her friends say the woman who was fired thought she was doing the right thing by helping catch the shoplifter, but it actually backfired on her.

    Robert Morrissey, 28, allegedly stuffed items in his jacket and walked out without paying, and then the theft detection scanner went off.

    An employee in her 60’s working the customer service desk tried to stop him.

    “She chased him outside as he was running from her,” said Salem Police Sgt. Jason Smith.

    Coworkers tell FOX25 that is what got her fired.

    “She called out to him, asking him to stop. He refused and began running through the parking lot. She followed him. And he started throwing items onto the ground,” Smith said.

    Officers say it could’ve potentially been a dangerous situation. But customers are outraged by the firing.

    “She was trying to do the company a service it sounds like by protecting them,” said customer Billie Wyatt.

    “It’s ridiculous,” said shopper Paul Calder. “Why would they fire her for trying to stop a shoplifter?”

    The employee has been working at the store for about a year. Everyone we talked to say she was just trying to do the right thing.

    FOX25 tried to get a statement from the Christmas Tree Shops’ corporate office, however, the spokesperson said they cannot discuss personnel matters.

    Morrissey was released on $1,000 bail.

    Louisiana National Guard conducts annual Christmas Tree Drop in Bayou … – WDSU New Orleans

    Christmas came early this week to the Bayou Sauvage National Wildlife Refuge.

    Members of the Louisiana National Guard’s 1st Assault Helicopter Battalion, 244th Aviation Regiment partnered with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on Thursday for the Christmas Tree Drop.

    SLIDESHOW: Annual Christmas Tree Drop in Bayou Sauvage

    According to the Louisiana National Guard, several recycled Christmas trees were collected and dropped in the Bayou Sauvage National Wildlife Refuge, which helps create new productive marsh habitat by trapping sediment.

    Officials said the effort will eventually help support native marsh grasses. Since it began, the project has re-established about 175 acres of marsh in the Bayou Sauvage NWR.

    Similar efforts happen in other areas of coastal Louisiana, like the Christmas tree recycling program in Jefferson Parish. More than 10,000 trees were placed along pre-constructed shoreline fences to help restore dunes and protect against coastal erosion earlier this year. 

    Nixa garden will soon be the home of city’s official Christmas tree – KY3

    NIXA, Mo. –

    Spring may have just started, but volunteers in Nixa are already preparing for the holidays.

    The Gardens at Woodfield is already home to 115 trees, but volunteers from the Azalea Festival Association will soon begin planting the conifers and holly trees for a Christmas garden.

    One tree, a 10-12 foot Norway Spruce, will be Nixa’s official Christmas tree and will be the designated spot for festivities this December.

    The city of Nixa owns the six acres of land, but they aren’t able to build on it because of a large sinkhole. So Nixa teamed up with the Azalea Association to develop the garden.

    Everything is funded by grants, donations and fundraisers, and it takes the help of a lot of volunteers.

    “As we develop the gardens more and more around the trails, it’s almost going to take on more of a natural setting, especially as the trees mature,” said Dow Whiting, Volunteer with the Azalea Festival Association. “It’s never going to be Central Park, but it’s a nice place to relax, get away.”

    The first trees were planted in the summer of 2011 and Nixa added the half-mile walking trail, lights and a parking lot in 2012.

    “Everybody that comes here loves it,” Whiting said. “We have a lot of walkers, especially in the nicer times of the year, spring and fall particularly, but a lot of the local residents come here on a daily basis, sometimes twice a day, to walk.”

    There are also 26 individual gardens, some of them memorial gardens, with more scheduled to be planted.

    “All of the green space that you see between the trails, outside the trails, will all be gardens, there won’t be any grass area left,” Whiting said. “The only grass area that’ll be left is this big sinkhole area that holds water in the spring when it rains a lot. So everything else will be planted in gardens.”

    A lot depends on funding and volunteers, but the 10-year plan is to have a garden oasis that everyone can enjoy.

    “You’ve got the birds chirping in the background, you’ve got the bees and the butterflies and it’s just nice to be outside in a relaxing atmosphere,” Whiting said.

    The Azalea Association holds several events each year to raise money, including their annual festival and a 5K run in September.

    For more information on the gardens at the Azalea Association, visit their website.

    To volunteer, contact Dow Whiting at dow@gardenadventuresnixa.com